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Tag Archives: Casey Blake

No, not the Beach Boy. The guy who Casey Blake hit a HR off Sunday. The guy who does that weird crossed-arms “X” thing after he closes out a game.

This guy:

wilson

So as it turns out, Mr. Wilson was pretty irritated about Casey Blake doing this, after hitting the HR off him.

blake

Considering Blake doesn’t exactly have the reputation of being a troublemaker, you’re left to assume that this was merely an immature demonstrative gesture in response to another immature demonstrative gesture. In other words, I doubt Blake would’ve bothered if he’d known what exactly the gesture’s all about.

Here’s some advice Brian. If you don’t want people getting irritated at what appears to be an immature demonstrative gesture, then 1. either don’t do it in the first place, or 2. don’t be so tight-lipped about what it means.

I don’t think anyone is ridiculing Brian Wilson’s faith. In fact, I’d go so far to say that sport is one of the few places where most people don’t mind outward displays of faith.

You know what though, Brian? Don’t stop giving glory to God. Just be a little more mindful of how you do it, and how it’s going to be perceived. Don’t be such a Pharisee, you know, with the flamboyant, outward displays and all.

Most of all, I know it’ll probably disappoint the Giant faithful, but don’t forget about the meek inheriting the earth, and turning the other cheek.

Right of the top, let me say that I’m indifferent to the Dodgers’ acquisitionhudson of Orlando Hudson — his contract however, is a piece of work. On the one hand, it’s a classic example of the Dodgers’ misguided personnel philosophy.

That philosophy goes a little something like this: if a position player vacates his position (e.g. Jeff Kent) via retirement, free agency, etc., or is unable to otherwise occupy his position (e.g. Nomar Garciaparra) the succeeding player at the position must always be a “proven” veteran who “knows how to win” and “plays the game the right way.” Other issues, such as the actual ability to hit or field a baseball, or the availability of cheaper, younger, healthier replacements not needing multi-year/million dollar deals are not remotely as important as the aforementioned.

Case in point: James Loney 2007, and of course, Blake DeWitt/Ivan DeJesus 2009, and to a lesser extent, Chin-Lung Hu and Tony Abreu 2009. By all indicators, DeWitt appeared to be at the very least, a serviceable, league-average 2B, with the potential to get better. Orlando Hudson on the other hand, lost a step defensively, and spentĀ  a considerable amount of time on the DL. Then again, it’s not as though THAT ever stopped the Dodgers from signing anyone!

On the other hand, the ONE good thing that’s come of this is that it again forces the hand of Manny/Boras. If they’re stupid enough to buy it, the plan is to move DeWitt back to 3B, Casey Blake to LF, and Juan Pierre to even further down the bench. And according the can’t-possibly-be-wrong L.A. radio personality Vic the Brick Jacobs, a deal has already been signed and was waiting to be announced. Colletti and Boras of course, denied such a thing had happened.

Either way, I really would’ve love for this charade to end. All I know is I’m glad I’m no longer living in L.A., since the discussion about this topic would be completely insufferable and intolerable at this point.

I can’t say that I’ve ever thought highly of Derek Lowe, his brilliant signing notwithstanding. As dependable as he’s been the four years he’s been here, there’s just something about the guy that I just don’t like. Nonetheless, he’s been arguably the Dodgers’ best free-agent signing of recent note. He signed a four-year, $32 million deal after being unceremoniously jettisoned by the 2004 WS Champion Red Sox — this after pitching well in the clinching games of the ALDS, ALCS, and World Series.

Former GM Paul DePodesta was 100% right about Lowe — this groundball specialist would thrive at Dodger Stadium, and even signed him to a very modest contract to boot.

Lots to love about Lowe, statistically speaking. Outside the lines, he’s been a grade-A scumbag. He divorced the mother of his children, whom he left behind on the east coast, so that he could continue his affair with former FSN West reporter Carolyn Hughes, and bemoaned (along with Jeff Kent and Luis Gonzalez) management’s choice to hold on to the “kids” in 2007 in lieu of trading them away for a trade-deadline rental.

Haven’t heard much of Lowe this year, which incidentally, is a contract year for him. Either he’s happy that so many of his 2004 Red Sox teammates are now Dodgers (Nomar, Manny, advisor to the GM Bill Mueller), or he knows he needs to keep his trap shut and avoid controversy considering he’s old (2009 will be his 36-year-old season) and probably still wants another multi-year deal.

That said, given the Dodgers’ offensive malaise — whole lot of change Manny Ramirez and Casey Blake did for the team — it’s surprising that he was so forgiving of the their inability to score recently. After yesterday’s loss to the 39 games under .500 Nationals, Lowe had this to say:

“I think, in this game, trying harder normally doesn’t get you anywhere, and I think that’s such a hard thing to fight,” he said. “You can’t give 110 percent. I think that’s where we are. There’s no lack of preparation, there’s no such thing as guys not trying. I think, as a collective group, sometimes you’ve got to try less to get more.

Knowing how quick everyone involved with the Dodgers has been willing to betray and blame Ethier/Kemp/Loney/Martin … I mean, their teammates for everything under the sun, it’s a little refreshing to hear Lowe not blame anyone.

In the end though, blame falls squarely on the shoulders of Ned Colletti. There’s a reason why the Dodgers are a singles-hitting team that relies heavily on a high BABIP, and will be in for epic failure when their BABIP falls as it has recently. That reason is Ned Colletti. Ned spent $57 million on Andruw Jones, Juan Pierre, Nomar, Jason Schmidt, and Rafael Furcal. The only one of that bunch that’s doing anything remotely productive is Andruw, and that’s solely because he’s been banished to Triple-A and not wasting a roster spot. (Okay, neither are Furcal and Schmidt).

Pierre and Nomar (not to mention Mark Sweeney, Pablo Ozuna, and Angel Berroa) continue to soak up valuable playing time, thus further delaying the advancement of players such as Delwyn Young, Chin-Lung Hu, and Ivan DeJesus — players who may actual be useful for the Dodgers.

Rather than use the money (or their minor leaguers) to acquire useful players such as Manny, or Adam Dunn, whom the Reds essentially gave away, the Dodgers waste their “stock” on retreads such as Casey Blake and Greg Maddux.

And then they cobble together a roster that has no punch aside from Kemp, Ethier, and Manny. So is it any surprise that a singles-hitting team can’t do anything other than hit singles?