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Tag Archives: Scott Boras

Right of the top, let me say that I’m indifferent to the Dodgers’ acquisitionhudson of Orlando Hudson — his contract however, is a piece of work. On the one hand, it’s a classic example of the Dodgers’ misguided personnel philosophy.

That philosophy goes a little something like this: if a position player vacates his position (e.g. Jeff Kent) via retirement, free agency, etc., or is unable to otherwise occupy his position (e.g. Nomar Garciaparra) the succeeding player at the position must always be a “proven” veteran who “knows how to win” and “plays the game the right way.” Other issues, such as the actual ability to hit or field a baseball, or the availability of cheaper, younger, healthier replacements not needing multi-year/million dollar deals are not remotely as important as the aforementioned.

Case in point: James Loney 2007, and of course, Blake DeWitt/Ivan DeJesus 2009, and to a lesser extent, Chin-Lung Hu and Tony Abreu 2009. By all indicators, DeWitt appeared to be at the very least, a serviceable, league-average 2B, with the potential to get better. Orlando Hudson on the other hand, lost a step defensively, and spentĀ  a considerable amount of time on the DL. Then again, it’s not as though THAT ever stopped the Dodgers from signing anyone!

On the other hand, the ONE good thing that’s come of this is that it again forces the hand of Manny/Boras. If they’re stupid enough to buy it, the plan is to move DeWitt back to 3B, Casey Blake to LF, and Juan Pierre to even further down the bench. And according the can’t-possibly-be-wrong L.A. radio personality Vic the Brick Jacobs, a deal has already been signed and was waiting to be announced. Colletti and Boras of course, denied such a thing had happened.

Either way, I really would’ve love for this charade to end. All I know is I’m glad I’m no longer living in L.A., since the discussion about this topic would be completely insufferable and intolerable at this point.

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So it turns out Manny/Boras, Inc. turned down the latest Dodger contract offer of one year/$25 million. An increased offer, which considering there have been no public counteroffers from any other team, is very generous.manny

Scott Boras is clearly grasping at straws trying to create a non-existent market for Manny. There’s the constant talk of the Giants being interested, but considering their payroll has inflated considerably with their free-agent additions, and their (like the Dodgers) insistence on nothing more than a short-term deal, it’s clear that the Giants aren’t really kicking the tires, so to speak. If anything, this is a lot like the 2006 postseason when Juan Pierre’s agent successfully used the Giants as leverage to increase the Dodgers’ offer to Pierre.

Fortunately, it appears Ned’s learned his lesson about that nonsense and isn’t budging from his stance. At least, not to the extent that he did with Pierre.

Spring training begins in less than two weeks. Manny, clearly one of the best hitters of this generation, remains unsigned. All of the big money players have either folded (Mets, Orioles), or flat-out didn’t even ante up (Yankees, Angels).

And now Boras says he won’t grant the Dodgers the “opportunity” to match any competitive offers? There haven’t been ANY competitive offers, Scott. Clearly this is a game of chicken with the intent of getting the Dodgers to ill-advisedly increase their own offer. And they shouldn’t — why bid against yourself?

There’s no doubt the fallout if Manny fails to return to LA will be spectacular. If it indeed Plans B, C, or D come to fruition, I’d hate to be Adam Dunn/Bobby Abreu/Juan Pierre (heaven forbid) trotting out to left field this year. I’d hate to be Ned, or Frank McCourt.

But in the end, the Dodgers are playing this correctly. Boras is feverishly trying to create a market that simply doesn’t exist. Worse yet, he, just like everybody else, knows LA is the best place for Manny. But unfortunately, we know that Boras operates under only one motive — his checkbook. If he were truly after his client’s best interest, Manny would’ve re-upped with the Dodgers ages ago.

texYou know who are the real losers? Toronto and Milwaukee. What should’ve been first-round draft pick compensation for losing type-A free agents now gets bumped down to lower rounds, since Los Angeles of Anaheim of Orange County of Southern California of the West Coast of the United States of North America gets the Yankees’ first-round pick (#26).

As an aside, it’s too bad the Yankees have another first-round pick, #28a, which they received as compensation for failing to sign 2008 first-rounder Gerrit Cole. Cole of course told the Yankees to take their money elsewhere and opted instead for some time at UCLA.

Who else loses? Both the Braves and Angels gave up considerable minor-league talent to acquire Tex, all for naught.

$23 million a year for Tex? Wow. You have to hand it to his agent, Scott Boras. In a recession year, the Yankees have now committed to pay $420 million in salary over the next eight years. But don’t ask them to pay for their own ballpark! That’s what the taxpayers of NYC are for!

Strangely enough, it’s interesting to see the Yankees actually add a free agent at a position that’s a weakness for them, instead of just going out and signing everybody. And I’m really surprised they preferred the oft-injured A.J. Burnett to the workhorse Derek Lowe.

I’d be really irritated if they somehow managed to sign Manny Ramirez as well. I mean, how many 1B/DH/LF types are they expecting to hold on to?

The good news? With the Angels publicly declaring they don’t want Manny, and the Red Sox obviously being a non-competitor, that really leaves just the Mets and Nationals as the only potential competition to sign Manny.

Right now, Ned Colletti’s choice to only offer a two-year/3rd-year option deal looks like genius. With no one else involved in the bidding, why capitulate to Scott Boras’ demands? While I doubt the deal Manny signs will pay him $22 million a year, Ned’s patience so far has worked in the Dodgers’ favor. Now we’ll get to see if he can close it out, and sign Ramirez to a reasonable contract.

I empathize with Braves GM Frank Wren, but ultimately, I feel he’s being childish. I don’t for a second believe that the Braves are going to follow through and ignore every single Wasserman client (which includes current Brave Peter Moylan, among others) from here on out. It’s just bravado; saving face in the wake of being publicly humiliated by Rafael Furcal and his agents. It’s the same sort of bravado Dodger GM Ned Colletti displayed when J.D. Drew and Scott Boras caught Colletti with his pants down. He too claimed he would “never deal with” Boras again. Yet, there’s a contract offer floating around from the Dodgers to Boras client Manny Ramirez.

Again, I won’t deny their anger, but really, business is business. Until Furcal’s signature appeared on the bottom of a contract, nothing was, well, nothing. It may be in bad faith, it may even be unethical, but it certainly wasn’t illegal for (Furcal agent) Paul Kinzer to ask for a term sheet (apparently recognized as the step immediately prior to finalization of a deal) and then use it as leverage to get a better deal from the Dodgers.

In fact, for once, it shows due diligence on the part of Dodger GM Ned Colletti. The agent claims theres “another offer?” Well, let’s SEE that other offer!

I remember the fiasco that was Kevin Brown’s signing — with Scott Boras ultimately getting the Dodgers to bid against themselves, since the “other offers” Boras spoke about were non-existent. In fact, what’s going on the Mark Teixiera fun-for-all is probably the exact same thing — Boras is probably trying to get the Angels, Nationals, et. al., to all bid against themselves — prompting a flat-out denial on the part of Red Sox owner John Henry.

We often forget that sports, for as much as our hearts are in invested in it, is and always will be a business first. The athletes, the clubs, everyone is in it to get theirs. So when Rafael Furcal is doing his best to get his, really, we can’t be surprised.

When Elton Brand did his best to get his, I wasn’t surprised — although I do take a littleĀ  bit of snide satisfaction that his defection to a “title contender” hasn’t exactly panned out.

Blame the agents if you must, blame the players, but don’t blame the game. Mainly because the game is always and always will be business, never personal.